Emergencies

Cash Based Approaches in Humanitarian Action

The use of cash transfers in humanitarian responses empowers crisis affected populations to meet their most basic need in a way that is dignified, and supports local economies in the process. UNICEF’s role in cash-based programming has been increasing steadily over the past years, including through linkages with social protection systems. On this page you will find policy guidelines, tools, as well as examples of cash transfer programmes we are implementing across sectors, regions, and within a varied typology of contexts.

EMOPS' Humanitarian Policy Section, in close collaboration with the social inclusion policy unit, as well as a growing network of practitioners across the organization, are available to provide technical support for setting up cash responses. We are setting up a knowledge exchange platform on Cash-Based Programming and social protection in fragile, humanitarian and risk-prone contexts. Please click here to request access to the platform. You can also join our Yammer community of practice on Cash Transfers by clicking here.

Welcome to the cash community!
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Guidelines and Tools

Operations

  • HR
  • Supply
  • Funding
  • Planning
  • Cluster Approach
  • More...

HR

  • Clarify the responsibilities of UNICEF and its partners regarding education in humanitarian situations.
  • Strengthen existing coordination mechanisms or, if unavailable, mechanisms in collaboration with national authorities to ensure that the humanitarian response is timely and coordinated, and that conforms to humanitarian principles and agreed-upon standards and benchmarks.

    Support a multi-sectoral rapid assessment mechanism and format, including priority education information.

    development kits or enter into stand-by agreements with suppliers and partners.

Supply

  • Support national authorities in planning for appropriate temporary learning spaces; establish codes of conduct to address all forms of violence, sexual exploitation, abuse and discrimination in learningsituations; and ensure joint preparedness planning with WASH and protection clusters and partners (see also WASH and child protection CCCs).

Funding

  • Promote school emergency preparedness plans, advocate for safe school structures and include basic disaster risk-reduction measures in school curricula.
  • Develop the capacity of education authorities in preparing the school system, at all levels, to respond to emergencies.

Planning

  • Clarify the responsibilities of UNICEF and its partners regarding education in humanitarian situations.
  • Strengthen existing coordination mechanisms or, if unavailable, mechanisms in collaboration with national authorities to ensure that the humanitarian response is timely and coordinated, and that conforms to humanitarian principles and agreed-upon standards and benchmarks.

    Support a multi-sectoral rapid assessment mechanism and format, including priority education information.

    development kits or enter into stand-by agreements with suppliers and partners.

Clusters

  • Support national authorities in planning for appropriate temporary learning spaces; establish codes of conduct to address all forms of violence, sexual exploitation, abuse and discrimination in learningsituations; and ensure joint preparedness planning with WASH and protection clusters and partners (see also WASH and child protection CCCs).

More...

  • Promote school emergency preparedness plans, advocate for safe school structures and include basic disaster risk-reduction measures in school curricula.
  • Develop the capacity of education authorities in preparing the school system, at all levels, to respond to emergencies.